Interviews and Performances - Video List
AP 60 to 51

Kollan dašne

Johny P. David plays Kollan dašne with instrumental accompaniment.

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AP 56c - Kollan dašne
Call Number

AP 56c

Part Number Part I - Syro Malabar Church
Title Kollan dašne
Duration 5:58
Place of Recording Johny P. David's residence
Date of Recording 26 July 2016
Youtube URL http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEXhhCPD-9k
Video Segment (s)

 

Notes

Johny P. David continues his mission of presenting his favorite Syriac melodies on Alto saxophone. In this video he plays the melody of “Kollan dašne” that used to be sung during the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament on Sundays and special feast days in the Syro Malabar churches, until the early 1970s. The Syriac text is the translation of the Latin chant, Pange Lingua (Sing my Tongue) that St. Thomas Aquinas wrote for the feast of Corpus Christi. This particular melody is a rare one. Probably, this melody was composed by the same person who composed “Šambah lešān” that we heard in Part 56A & 56B (see notes on these entries).

Johny seems to be the only one who knows it. But for his efforts to document it, this melody would have been lost for ever. Johny voluntarily spent his time and resources to record it with instrumental accompaniment for the Aramaic Project, and preserve it for posterity.

Once again, Johny manifests his respect for the history of the St. Thomas Christians in the selection of the performance space for this video. The performance took place on the premises of the St. Thomas Syro Malabar Catholic Church at Palayur, in Kerala. Palayur is one of the seven locations where St. Thomas the Apostle is believed to have established Christin communities. The statues in the back ground show the Apostle preaching to the local Hindu priests. Music, indeed is embedded in history.

Johny P. David is an extraordinary musician, who has an excellent command over the musical instrument of his choice. With seeming effortlessness, he weaves musical phrases by lacing notes with subtle dynamics and subdued ornamentations and, thereby, evokes internal silence.....Joseph J. Palackal

Related Videos

  • AP 4t - Kollan daśnē [Let us all offer; Syriac of `Pange lingua' by St. Thomas Aquinas] Track 22 from Qambel Maran: Syriac Chants from South India
  • AP 25o - Rev. Fr. Sebastian Sankoorikkal: Melody of “Kollan dasne.” Syriac translation of Tantum Ergo.
  • AP 48a - Melody of "Kollan Dasne" (Pange Lingua). Ammini John Anamthuruthil.
  • AP 51b - Melody of "Kollan Dasne" From Syriac Translation Of the Benediction hymn Tantum Ergo.
  • AP 52b - A unique melody of "Kollan dasne."
  • AP 240 - Syriac East meets Latin West Part 1: Sambah Lesan & Kollan Dasne

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